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ISIS Beheaded 21 Christians, But It Couldn’t Silence Their Faith

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Tissue vibration causes neovascularization. Vibration can be caused by soundwaves or mechanical devices, for example by laying the penis on an electric drill and turning the drill on. Remove any drill bit.

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A final selfie and a harrowing goodbye: The moving diary entries of the daughters who threw a hen party to pay for their mother to take her own life at a suicide clinic

Daily Mail

Looking back on it now, they can understand the fuss. Who, after all, would plan a such a peerlessly inappropriate fundraiser? A ‘ladies’ night’ in Llanelli complete with drag queen and near naked waiters in order to send their own mother to Dignitas, the Swiss euthanasia clinic?

The public was bemused, the police were called and the event duly cancelled.

‘We felt quite stupid,’ admits Tara O’Reilly, who organised the party with her sister Rose Baker. ‘We were told we were breaking the law – encouraging suicide. But we weren’t thinking about any of that. We were just desperate.’ And with good reason. Their mother Jackie Baker, diagnosed with motor neurone disease, was declining fast. Months of agonising pain and uncertainty lay before them. Today, though, that terror has completely gone. For all the kerfuffle of the failed party and despite the months of misery that followed, the sisters feel only relief.

Three weeks ago, in a faceless trading estate on the outskirts of Zurich, their 59-year-old mother clicked a button with her toe and passed away, killed by a powerful cocktail of barbiturates, as she had wished.

And at last Rose and Tara are free to tell a story that will touch everyone who reads it – about the fear of the diagnosis, the turmoil of hearing their mother ask for Dignitas, and about their passionate belief in new laws to support assisted dying.

Jackie, who had lived close to her daughters in Morriston, a former tinplate and copper town near Swansea, had been a keen amateur photographer and musician. All that changed with the diagnosis back in February. Jackie’s own mother had died of the condition, so the three of them knew exactly what to expect.

A week later, Tara, 40, caught Jackie looking up ways to commit suicide on the internet. ‘I told her she was being ridiculous,’ Tara says. ‘Then she said she wanted to go to Dignitas. I had no idea what she was talking about.

‘I just thought, here we go, it’s one of Mum’s hippy trippy things. She said it would cost £8,000. She didn’t have a bean to her name. We didn’t realise it was even an option, like a dog being taken to be put down, really.’

Her sister Rose, 29, who works in a call centre, continues: ‘I hoped it was just a phase. It was so stressful that I had to stop working. How could I answer people’s questions about faults with their televisions when Mum was talking about killing herself?’

To raise the money, Tara, a hairdresser, decided on the £15-per-head ladies’ night, which soon came to the attention of the media – and the police. Two officers visited Tara at her salon after receiving a complaint from Care Not Killing, a group which opposes euthanasia and assisted dying.

They warned her that if the party went ahead, Tara and her guests could be prosecuted.

The event was cancelled – yet the publicity was what saved the family. Donations from total strangers poured in. One woman gave £2,000. Two Swiss bankers got in touch and offered to let the family stay at their house in Switzerland. Dignitas informed Tara that they offered a reduced rate for those in financial difficulty.

Earlier this month, Tara and Rose accompanied their mother on the gruelling 18-hour trip to Zurich and watched as she administered the fatal dose of drugs.

In September, Parliament rejected plans to enshrine the right to die in law in England and Wales, with 118 MPs voting in favour and 330 against.

Despite this, Tara and Rose are in no doubt when it comes to their own beliefs. ‘Our mother should have had an injection in her own home two months ago,’ says Tara.

‘But instead she had to travel for 18 hours in complete agony, sitting in her own urine. There’s a need for assisted dying and for the law to change. Our mum is proof of that.’

More than 160 Britons have taken their own lives at Dignitas in the past six years.

She could have had another year in pain,’ Tara continues. ‘It would have been selfish for us to keep her here. ‘When we actually got to Switzerland, there was a calmness. We knew we were doing the right thing.’

Not that it was in any way easy. Indeed, as this searingly honest and at times disturbing diary of their mother’s final journey makes clear, there can be no doubt at all of the desperation and the sheer humanity that drove them into the arms of Dignitas.

Getting the green light October 25, 2015

Tara: The email giving us a provisional green light came from Dignitas today. I was at the salon and then had to cut some poor woman’s hair.

I did think, ‘Thank God’, but there was a crushing feeling too. This is it. It’s all been a rush and now we’re going in ten days. Mum’s eyes lit up when I told her. She said she was over the moon. She can’t wait to go. I feel relief. She’s so ill and in so much pain. Every movement is like a knife going through her.

But it’s heartbreaking, too. I was just thinking about Christmas and how we’ll all be together as usual. But then I had the most gut-wrenching feeling because Mum won’t be here, will she? We’ll never have another Christmas with her.

Rose: Mum’s GP said she was too ill to fly. Part of me desperately wants Mum to change her mind but I know she never will. I said she could get the train but that it would be a long and painful journey. She doesn’t care. She just wants to go.

The last journey November 2

Tara: I’ve been playing Mum’s last moments over in my mind. I keep having visions of what her last words will be. I want them to be heartfelt but she has become so detached from us lately. I’ve been knocking myself out every night with a bottle of wine. I’ve been absolutely dreading today but now it’s here I feel strangely relieved and calm.

This morning Rose and I woke up at 3.30am to start the journey to Switzerland. When we got to Mum’s nursing home she was beaming, ready to go. There were no staff around. They’ve been warned not to get involved. We got a taxi to London at 4.30am. It was tough seeing her in the back in this huge wheelchair.

The driver was useless. He didn’t know the way and we missed the Eurostar. When we got to the station Mum was in such pain and kept crying out. One of the Eurostar managers told me he didn’t think she could travel. I’ve never felt so desperate until that moment. ‘We have to get on that train. We have to get to Switzerland,’ I told him. He knew what I meant. It was pretty clear by our distraught faces that we didn’t just want to do away with our mother.

He went to speak to someone higher up, came back and put us all on to the next train in first class. ‘I didn’t realise, good luck to you all and God bless,’ he said.

Rose: In Paris we missed the next train but managed to get on to a later one. We got to Zurich at about 11pm, 18 hours after we had set off.

The final countdown November 3

Tara: We went to see our Dignitas-assigned doctor at 8.30am in a Zurich clinic. This was not the place where you go to die. It looked more like a Botox clinic.

Everyone who goes to Dignitas must have two appointments, each on a different day. There was no ramp and the lift wasn’t fit for Mum’s wheelchair, so she was seen in a little corridor. The doctor was German and very matter-of-fact.

‘You want to die, Jackie?’ she asked Mum. She asked a few times. Mum just said, ‘Yes’ with no emotion.

Tonight is the happiest I’ve seen her since her diagnosis. She had Bob Marley on and was bobbing her head to the beat. She had her Complan food and her morphine. We had wine and pizza. She told me not to drink any more and to go to bed. She seemed scared that we wouldn’t get it right. She’s vulnerable and has put all of her trust in us.

Rose: It’s been a sad day, but we’ve tried to make the most of it. There have been lots of genuine I love yous and thank yous.

Mum’s last day November 4

Tara: It’s a lovely sunny day. Mum was going to wear her purple and yellow tie-dye dress, but decided on her more comfortable pyjamas because she’s ‘going to sleep’.

We got to Dignitas at about 9.30am, after seeing the same German doctor who again asked if she wanted to die. Now the taxi took us to an industrial estate. There were a few other units and a burger place next door.

They didn’t broadcast themselves. There was no sign: ‘Here’s Dignitas, drop-in only.’ We were struck by how down at heel it all looked. We were met by two of the clinic’s workers. The man must have been close to 80, he had a pierced ear and a pipe.

We walked straight into the room. It was like walking into somebody’s house. There was a hospital bed, an antique-looking dining table and chairs, an old stained rug, an old sofa and a painting that your nan might have had. There was a little window that looked out to the garden. There was no equipment. They brought that in afterwards.

Rose: I was trying desperately not to cry. But when we first got into the room, Mum said: ‘Thanks for getting me here.’ That started us both off. She said: ‘Don’t cry.’ There was no emotion to it.

We helped her into the bed with a hoist. They held a form up to her so she could sign it using a marker pen in her mouth. She gagged a bit.

Tara: I didn’t like watching that. It felt so final. It didn’t seem professional. The Dignitas lady was very happy. She offered us coffee before going over to Mum and taking her hand. ‘Jackie, do you want to die today?’ she said in a sing-song voice. Mum just said: ‘Yes.’ The woman added: ‘You’ll be out of your misery soon and in a better place.’ She told us Mum would go into a deep sleep and then a coma before her brain and all of her organs failed. I thought, bloody hell. It was so matter-of-fact.

Mum had to use her foot to push the button to release the poison. Nothing seemed modern or up to date. There was a big syringe that went into a little machine which was attached to a tube in Mum’s stomach.

Rose: We took a last selfie and then Mum was given an anti-sickness solution. It took 20 minutes to take effect. You couldn’t say goodbye properly. We just sat there not knowing what to do.

Tara: After 20 minutes they asked Mum if she wanted to say anything, but she didn’t even say goodbye. We said we loved her and were going to miss her. It wasn’t Mum at that point. She’d already gone. They told us not to touch any of the machines because we could get into trouble. They filmed the next bit. They said: ‘Jackie, when you’re ready, push the button.’ Mum did it straight away.

Rose: It didn’t take long, minutes really. She just stared through us and then went into a deep sleep and stopped breathing. Then she did a little snore, which made us laugh and cry at the same time. It was so Mum. We watched the blood drain from her face. We watched her take her last breath. It was peaceful really. We both kissed Mum goodbye for the last time and walked out into the winter sunshine. It was so hard to leave her there.

We went to a hotel and got drunk. I had flashes of her face at the end for the rest of the day. Neither of us had seen a dead body before.

The Aftermath November 5

Tara: We both felt absolutely lost. We’ve been pushing Mum’s empty wheelchair around like lost souls with people staring. It’s horrible, heartbreaking.

Mum wanted to be cremated. Dignitas have organised all of that. We flew back to Britain in silence.

There’s every chance that one of us or even both of us could get motor neurone disease. It’s in the family.

Mum was told there was a five per cent chance of her getting it. After seeing what it does, it is terrifying. I think about it every day. I’ve got a lump in my left hand and my first thought was it’s MND. I’m not sure if I could go to Dignitas or ask anyone to come and watch me die.

Rose: Why is agony acceptable but ending your life and your suffering is not? It was Mum’s choice, not ours. It has been a nice ending for her, in a way. Yes, it’s terribly sad and we’re both devastated, but we also feel a sense of relief that she got her happy ending.

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Demography is destiny. That is why Saudi Arabia and Qatar have established billion-dollar funds to provide financial support for every child born in Europe to a Muslim parent. The money is available through mosque charities.

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'I'm a normal guy. I just fancy six-year-olds: 'Virtuous' paedophile who is aroused by girls aged under 13 but 'doesn’t act on his impulses' reveals why his British wife has stood by him

Daily Mail

A self-described 'virtuous pedophile' who admits to being sexually attracted to girls as young as six has spoken about how he lives with his urges - and his plans to help other people cope with theirs.

Gary Gibson, 65, of Oregon, has set up a non-profit organisation - the Association for Sexual Abuse Prevention - to help people like him who choose not to offend.

The Christian ex-teacher, whose family has a history of incestual child abuse, is one of 1,800 members of an online forum for non-offending pedophiles.

He detailed some of his alleged family history in a series of online videos.

'My grandfather sexually abused my mother and I think at least one of his sisters, and my father’s woman was known on the streets to be one that invited the little boys into her house and did things with them,' he said in a video published last month.

'So, I think, she is a pedophile. I know for a fact my father sexually abused several of my sisters – nearly all of them.

'When I was six, my two older sisters taught me to play "go to sleep". My understanding was I was to get them to take their panties off and get them ready to sleep. I don’t think it was abuse, but it left me with the impression that little girls want to be touched.

'When I was about 12, I spent a summer with my cousins and there was some sexual games that went on there… both of these girls were five years younger. I was 12, I think one of them was seven and one of them was five.

'I knew that it was wrong, but frankly in the fifties, every male I knew was sexually attracted to children and little girls.'

In the speech, he then questioned whether pedophilia was something that could be passed down among a family, before saying he never considered himself to be one throughout most of his adult life.

'I had never called myself a pedophile, but for more than 50 years I have been sexually attracted to little girls. I choose not to act on it,' he said.

'I knew I was attracted to little girls, I was always a little close, maybe I hugged them too tight, or did some things I shouldn’t have done, but I never penetrated a child, never – what I would call – had sex with a child.

'I choose not to do that, but I struggle with it.'
His struggles intensified when his first marriage broke down in the nineties, and he decided to 'spend some time out in the South Pacific', where he said there were 'a lot of little girls running around naked'.

After a couple of years he returned home, and met British nurse Tabitha Abel - woman who would become his wife - through a Christian singles dating site in 2004.

They married in 2005. Eventually, they built a log cabin in Oregon, which included rooms for their grandchildren.
But he was still dogged by his desires.

'The first time I remember changing my daughter’s diaper I thought, "Am I going to touch her" or something, but I made the decision right there that was not going to happen,' he said in the video, before explaining how he and his wife chose to adopt foster children because their grandchildren did not visit enough.

Gibson says the children eventually moved on for 'other reasons', however a 10-year-old girl who had lived with him and Abel developed what he called 'false memories'.

'Now you tell me, I mean society says children never lie about sexual abuse. But here the Oregon State Police show up at our door one day and say, "Do you know why I’m here?"' the 65-year-old said.

'They proceeded to tell me this girl disclosed that I lay on the bed naked with her. I said that never happened, and then they said: “Well, she said you put your penis inside of her.” I said that never happened, and they asked me to do a polygraph.

'So I contacted a lawyer, this was like two days before Christmas 2010, the attorney said don’t do the polygraph.'

He said it was that brush with the police that forced him to 'come out' to his wife.

'I told her I didn't do it, but this is where I'm at... I'm attracted to kids,' he said.

During a recent interview, Gibson explained why he is attracted to young girls - but not young boys or teenagers.

The 'comfortably out' pedophile, whose wife is a nurse, said he is normally not aroused by teenage girls and does not have any desire for young boys.

'When they pass 12 they tend to get into themselves, start to make themselves look older, and I like things natural - so there we are,' he told The Sun in the UK.

'When they start wearing lipstick and stuff like that I don't find it very appealing.'

Despite his attractions, Gibson added he is 'a normal everyday person'.

'I don't go around in a white van giving candy to kids in the park,' he said.

Gibson' wife then told the British newspaper she does not consider her husband to be a pedophile because: 'most people I consider a pedophile to be a child molester – which he isn't.'

The interview then went into some more graphic details about Gibson's sexual habits.

He told the newspaper he does not seek out pornography involving children when he masturbates, but added he doesn't 'beat himself up' if he does watch scenes involving young people.

'I don't feel bad it about because it's not reality, I can differentiate between fantasy and reality,' he said.

The 65-year-old also seemed to have come to terms with his life as a pedophile, despite understanding that it makes him unpopular with many.

'If people knew I was a pedophile they wouldn't like me,' he said. 'But overall my life has gone fairly well.'

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We are different. For us, the adherents of Kreutz Religion, sex is sacred. Sexual intercourse is religious service. Flirting is worship. Optimal orgasms build our immortal soul. Our karma depends on sexual success. Evolution has a spiritual dimension.

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Feminism in Europe makes second-generation male Muslim immigrants suicide bombers. Up to now it's only explosives. But a poison gas attack isn't far away.

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Japan's Shame

TIME

Tokyo, Police superintendent Keiji Goto logs onto his Toshiba laptop, opens his Netscape Internet browser and moves his mouse to the Yahoo! Japan search engine. He types in adult. Down the screen scrolls a list of site categories, many of them with the telltale suffix jp, denoting that they originate in Japan. He clicks on one that promises images of lolitas. The home page appears with a picture of a pig-tailed Japanese girl in a sailor-style school uniform. He clicks again. On the screen appears another teenager, this one naked. Click. A girl is bound and gagged. Click. Another is being fondled. Child pornography, Goto says, is our national shame. It's also the latest export market to be dominated by Japan. The country lags far behind the U.S. in the hottest industry of the 1990s, electronic commerce. Japan has just two of the world's top 100 information-technology companies, according to a Business Week survey, compared with 57 from the U.S. In one area of dubious distinction, however, jp.com competes with the best: child pornography. According to estimates from Interpol, as much as 80% of the child porn available on commercial sites worldwide originates in Japan. A police study found more than 3,000 Websites based in Japan distributing pornography, 40% of them featuring children. Policing porn on the Internet is difficult anywhere, says Ralf Mutschke, assistant director of Interpol's criminal division. But most of the world at least has laws that prohibit child pornography. Japan doesn't.

This lack of legislation frustrates global attempts to crack down. We're asked by international police to help arrest child pornographers, but there's nothing we can do, says Goto, deputy director of the National Police Agency's community safety bureau. Japan's criminal law prohibits sex with minors, but a minor is defined as someone age 12 or younger, and the only act specifically outlawed is sexual intercourse. Taking lewd pictures of children is permissible. Some pornography--both with adults and children--is banned under an obscenity code, but only if it explicitly shows genitalia.

To show how difficult it is to prosecute, Goto zooms in on an onscreen photo of a naked girl. Bright pink Japanese characters spelling secret cover the girl's crotch. Employing special software that can be downloaded for free from other websites, Goto electronically removes the computer-generated fig leaf. Yet even this full frontal nudity can't be legally called obscene. The photo is a little fuzzy there, Goto points out. It's not really clear enough. Some especially sensational cases have been prosecuted. In March, a real-estate company owner was arrested for selling CD-ROMs containing hundreds of child porn videos apiece, all downloaded from the Internet. In January, a schoolteacher was accused of dressing up in wig and skirt to take videos of women bathing at a hot spring resort in Fukui. In March, a mother was arrested for letting men have sex with her 15-year-old daughter for $85 a session. Another mother was sentenced to four years probation in December for taking $850 from an Osaka hospital employee to photograph her 10-year-old daughter in the nude. Last year, a 35-year-old high school teacher in Gifu was accused of taking videos underneath girls' skirts by standing under a staircase.

It's an embarrassment, says Mayumi Moriyama, a member of the lower house of parliament and a former education minister. Anyone who wants to buy, sell or produce child pornography comes to Japan. We make it easy for them. Moriyama, a member of the dominant Liberal Democratic Party, joined several opposition lawmakers last week in introducing legislation to crack down on the scourge. A watered-down version of a bill that failed to pass last year, the law is far from perfect. It wouldn't make possession of child porn illegal. And the definition of what kind of pornography is punishable, while broader than the current obscenity code, would remain vague, making prosecution difficult. But the law would impose prison terms of up to three years for people who distribute, sell or display child pornography.

New regulations crafted to control child porn on the Net went into effect last week, but these are weakly worded as well. It requires distributors to register with the police (but threatens no penalties if they do not) and asks Internet service providers to remove objectionable material voluntarily. The ojii-san (old men) don't understand cyberspace, so they don't understand how easy it is for pornographic photos of Japanese children to get sent all over the world, says Yutaka Iimori, a coordinator with the CyberAngels, a group whose 33 volunteers scan the Internet on their home computers and collect pornographic addresses, which are then turned over to the police.

The standard opposition to any attempt at curbing porn is that it infringes upon free speech, a concept handed to Japan by the U.S. after World War II and, as in America, defended fiercely by activists. I quite agree that we have to fight against the sexual abuse of children, says parliament member Yukio Edano. But we have to weigh that against protecting the rights to free speech.

Preventing people from getting their hands on pornography doesn't seem to be much of a threat right now. The country is awash in child porn, and there's little attempt at hiding it. Subway riders peruse pornographic comics that are explicit, graphic and sometimes violent in their depiction of young girls. Porn outlets dot the landscape of Japanese cities, and even mainstream book shops, newsstands and convenience stores sell explicit material. General interest magazines and newspapers also feature erotic photography, as well as advertisements for sex shops and escorts.

Countless magazines and videos offer images of girls dressed in school uniforms, a favorite fantasy. Girls in physical education classes and at swimming pools sometimes become unknowing subjects of clandestine photographers. Their handiwork ends up filling pages of specialized magazines that show girls in shorts or underwear or undressing in public changing rooms. Much of it ends up on the Internet, as well. We get asked all the time by men to go with them to hotels to take naked pictures, says a 14-year-old girl loitering outside a bar in one of Tokyo's neon-lit entertainment meccas, Ikebukuro. On a rainy Saturday night, the streets are jammed with young girls and male recruiters, called scouts, who try to coax the girls into clubs that feature advertising placards depicting cartoon schoolgirls and come-ons like Let's enjoy play with sexy girls. Usually I say no, she insists. But if they give me 80,000 yen [$675], I'll do it.

Japan has a polite term for the teen-sex peddlers: enjo kosai, which translates as supportive relationship. According to Junko Miyamoto, coordinator of a private group campaigning to stop sexual exploitation of children, the term was invented to make prostitution sound O.K. Of the dozens of girls Time recently interviewed, each said she had been offered money to have sex or be photographed nude. There are myriad ways for male customers to hook up with enjo kosai: karaoke lounges, love hotels, strip clubs, magazine ads and telephone clubs where men sit in a booth and take calls from girls dialing in on their cell phones. The problem is people don't regard this as sexual exploitation, says Miyamoto. They regard it as misbehaving kids.

The common explanation for Japan's tolerance of child porn is that the country is run by a clique of old men with little sensitivity toward women and children. But it's not just old men who are involved. Most of our customers are in their 30s, says Seiji Wasaki, 27, a clerk in a porn shop in Tokyo's Shinjuku entertainment district. Parliament member Edano, at 34 one of Japan's youngest politicians, views it as a matter of choice. You can't neglect the fact that some high school girls quite willingly do this, he says. If the girl and the man agree to exchange money for sex, and if it's really her will, then it is completely the act of individuals and shouldn't be regulated. The problem, Edano says, is that the girls haven't been properly educated to make an informed decision. A man who frequents teen prostitutes (and who prefers not to be identified) claims that two years ago, the going rate for sex with a 16-year-old girl was $250. Today, men want younger partners. A tryst with a 12-year-old costs more than $400.

There's another theory for the obsession with pedophilia: that Japanese men feel threatened by adult women. Many men are incapable of relating to adult women on an equal stance, says Yukihiro Murase, a professor of human sexuality at Tokyo's Hitotsubashi University. Whatever the explanation, it won't be easy getting a tough law against child porn through the male-dominated parliament. In fact, a similar effort failed last year. But the exposure of Japan's child porn on the Internet may serve a useful purpose for cracking down on this shameful trade, for it has brought the smut out of the insular world of Japan for all the world to see. We feel embarrassed, says parliament member Moriyama. So now we want to hurry up and do something.

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Erectile dysfunction is mostly a vascular disease. Shockwave therapy, as commonly applied by Thai urologists, causes total neovascularization of the vital organ. The result: super erections, even at age 75.

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As long as you can fall in love again with a beautiful young woman, you will never die. That is the power of butea superba.

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‘Anesthesia Awareness:’ Waking Up During Surgery Can Have Long Lasting Psychological Affects

February 15, 2017 11:41 PM

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Having surgery can be a frightening prospect, but imagine waking up during that surgery when you’re not supposed to.

As CBS2’s Kristine Johnson explained, it happens and the trauma can be life-changing if you find yourself awake under the knife.

“I heard yelling and screaming, and then the room became more real,” Jim Sabastian said.

“I could hear all these people panicking around me, but I must have been strapped to the table so I wouldn’t move,” David Pletzner said.

Those are terrified recollections from surgical patients.

“I saw the three lights of the operating room on me, and then the next thing, and then a lot of pain in my neck — were yanking on my head and pulling it back like this,” Sabastian said.

“Somebody said, ‘He’s awake,'” Pletzner added.

Sabastian and Pletzner both woke when they were supposed to be under anesthesia. It’s reported in about two of every 1,000 patients, but those who experience “anesthesia awareness: said it’s nothing short of traumatizing.

“The surgeon was freaking out with the anesthesiologist because he was running out of time,” Sabastian said.

Sabastian was having emergency surgery for a ruptured appendix.

Dr. Kiran Patel is an anesthesiologist who said anesthesia awareness has been associated with certain types of procedure.

“That would include cardiac surgery, high-risk Cesarean sections, or trauma,” Dr. Patel said.

It can leave doctors scrambling and patients in distress.

“We have to balance their safety and really honestly keeping them alive. We can’t give more anesthesia because their vital signs can’t support it,” Dr. Patel explained.

Pletzner has had multiple surgeries. He’s also had anesthesia awareness more than once.

“I woke up as they were either drilling or sawing my skull, and it was kind of like an out-of-body experience,” Pletzner said.

He said thankfully he didn’t feel anything then, though he wasn’t so lucky another time.

“I remember that like it was yesterday, because I could feel them with the needle in my finger,” he said.

Pletzner needed skin grafts on his hand, when he woke up during surgery this time, he said he remembers screaming from the pain.

“This was horrific,” he said.

“They’ll experience nightmares. They’ll experience flashbacks. This can also lead to depression,” Dr. Matthew Lorber said.

Dr. Matthew Lorber, a psychiatrist, said the experiences can also lead to post-traumatic stress disorder. Both Pletzner and Sabastian said they have moved on, but they dread any future procedures.

“Unless it’s absolutely life-threatening and completely necessary, I will not go for any surgery, not after that,” Sabastian said.

Whether you’re having a high risk procedure or just afraid you mat experience anesthesia awareness. Experts suggest discussing it with your doctor.

If it does happen, even having that conversation can reduce any potential trauma you may experience.

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Terrorists are developing a new tactics. Instead of killing victims, they just castrate them, and let them live on. Planned for Swedish and Norwegian men. Perpetrators will just get 6 months in jail.

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Feminism is the ideology of ugly females who can't get a man to say "You are the most beautiful women in the world!" The idea behind feminism is: restrict sex for men wherever possible. In the hope that if sex is not available otherwise, some man will still like their ugly ass.

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