oheho.com

beheading

ISIS Beheaded 21 Christians, But It Couldn’t Silence Their Faith

Home | Index of articles

----

Feminism in Europe makes second-generation male Muslim immigrants suicide bombers. Up to now it's only explosives. But a poison gas attack isn't far away.

----

Anesthesia Awareness

Duke University Scool of Medicine Duke Anesthesiology

When the movie “Awake” came out in theaters it sparked much controversy throughout the country about the condition also known as anesthesia awareness. Following the release of the movie, Larry King Live did a special about this issue, in which King interviewed physicians and patients who have suffered from awareness. In response to the recent influx in publicity over the issue, the DREAM Campaign has taken the initiative to interview Dr. Tong Joo (TJ) Gan, who sheds light on many concerns that patients have when considering a surgical procedure as well as the misconceptions about anesthesiology in general. With so much focus on awareness and the negative impacts of anesthesia, it is important that the public be properly informed. Awareness can be a highly unpleasant experience, but most times the alternative is a surgery with negative outcomes or even worse, death.

There are about 100 to 150 reported cases of anesthesia awareness per year in the United States. It is very difficult to get an exact figure because it is under reported. Dr. Gan shared with us a case in which a patient of his experienced anesthesia awareness. The patient had come to the Emergency Room with a gunshot wound to the abdomen. He was suffering from massive blood loss and had very faint blood pressure so the anesthesiologist had to administer a safe dosage of anesthesia that would not hinder the overall well being of the patient as well as the blood pressure. When questioned post-operatively, the patient reported that he could hear voices during a brief period in surgery.

Hearing is said to be the last sense to go and the first to return under general anesthesia. As in the case of Dr. Gan’s patient, the modifications that had to be made because of low blood pressure caused the patient to become slightly aware and that is why he was able to hear briefly during his operation. “He did not suffer from any consequences after that and in fact, he thought that it was part of the operation,” said Dr. Gan.

When asked the common question, how can a person feel pain when they are paralyzed, Dr. Gan discussed the three areas of anesthesia; paralysis which paralyzes the muscles, analgesic which block pain signals to the brain, and anesthetic which puts the person to sleep so that they do not remember anything. For this reason, a person can be physically paralyzed but they may still feel pain. The human body does have natural responses to pain such as sweating, increased blood pressure and movement which may indicate to the anesthesia care provider that they are not fully anesthetized.

New technology allows anesthesiologists to measure the brain waves of a patient even while they are under anesthesia. “By using specific monitors, one can tell how deep a person is in anesthesia,” says Dr. Gan, “It is a bit like an iceberg; if it is below the water, it is very difficult to know how deep the iceberg is, and the monitor tells you what the depth of anesthesia is even when the patient is asleep.” The Bi-spectral Index Monitor, or BIS monitor is an example of such a device. Brainwaves are measured on a range of numbers from 0 to 100 in which 0 equates no brain activity and 100 is the mental state of a person when fully awake. During general anesthesia, brainwaves are measured between 40 and 60. If the BIS monitor measures activity above 70, there is a very good chance that the patient may not be fully anesthetized.

Dr. Gan mentions several fascinating facts throughout the interview one being that genetic factors can influence the way a patient reacts to anesthesia. Studies have shown that women tend to wake up about 10 minutes sooner than men when the anesthesia is cut off. This means that women need more anesthesia in order to produce the same effect. Redheads are also said to need more as well.

The revolutionary research that is being done by researchers like Dr. Gan is vital to prevent cases of unpleasant experiences and side effects. “One of the most effective ways to try and prevent this problem is to raise awareness of this problem, no pun intended,” Dr. Gan explains, “So we educate our staff, anesthesiologists and anesthesia care providers to let them know that this problem does exist and therefore it is important to take steps as well as understand the patient to try and prevent it.” He also mentions that there are mandatory educational modules that every anesthesia care provider must take. These modules go through various aspects of educational awareness such as the incidents of awareness, the scenarios where awareness may happen, the drugs or drug combinations that would reduce the incidents of awareness as well as monitoring the inter-operative awareness.

The Department of Anesthesiology is committed to find as many ways possible to provide the best patient care. Dr. Gan’s research in particular focuses on steps that could alleviate patients from the common unpleasant side effects of anesthesia and surgery by improving patient outcomes during the perioperative (before, during and after surgery) period including anesthesia awareness, pain, nausea and vomiting, and bowel dysfunction through the use of drug and non-drug method, such as acupuncture. Our hope is that through listening to this interview, people will become educated about the issue and in turn they will be relieved of any anxiety they may face about being under anesthesia.

Dr. Gan is a professor and devoted researcher here at Duke, whose interests include Anesthetic-related Clinical Pharmacology, Inter-operative Awareness and Post-Operative Pain, Nausea and Vomiting, and using Acupuncture. He came to Duke as a visiting associate and fellow in 1993 is now serving as both professor and Vice Chairman of Clinical Research. Dr. Gan is also known for his research on the Bi-spectral Index (BIS) Monitor.

Patient Awareness Under General Anesthesia Lifeline to Modern Medicine

What is patient awareness under general anesthesia? Awareness under general anesthesia is a rare condition that occurs when surgical patients can recall their surroundings or an event—sometimes even pain—related to their surgery while they were under general anesthesia.

When using other kinds of anesthesia, such as local, sedation or regional anesthesia, it is expected that patients will have some recollection of the procedure.

Studies are not conclusive on the frequency of awareness under general anesthesia, but even one case is important to anesthesia professionals (anesthesiologists and certified registered nurse anesthetists), who recognize that this can be a distressing or traumatic experience for the patient.

When awareness during general anesthesia does occur, it is usually just prior to the anesthetic completely taking effect or as the patient is emerging from anesthesia. In very few instances, it may occur during the surgery itself. Despite the rarity of awareness, members of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) and the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA) want you to know about this possibility. These organizations have been studying this issue and are in the process of evaluating the effectiveness of various technologies and techniques to decrease the likelihood of this occurring.

Why does it happen? In some high-risk surgeries such as trauma, cardiac surgery and emergency cesarean delivery, or in situations involving patients whose condition is unstable, using a deep anesthetic may not be in the best interest of the patient. In these and other critical or emergency situations, awareness may not be completely avoidable. While the safety of anesthesia has increased markedly over the last 20 years, people may react differently to the same level or type of anesthesia. Sometimes different medications can mask important signs that anesthesia professionals monitor to help determine the depth of anesthesia. In other rare instances, technical failure or human error may contribute to unexpected episodes of awareness. The ultimate goal is always to protect the life of the patient and to make the patient as comfortable as possible. That is why it is important to have highly trained anesthesia professionals involved in your surgery.

How can it be avoided? Before surgery, patients should meet with their anesthesia professional to discuss anesthesia options. Should there be concerns regarding awareness, this is an ideal time to express them and to ask questions. Patients should share with their anesthesia professional any problems they may have experienced with previous anesthetics, and also discuss any prescription medications or over-the-counter medications they are taking.

As always, your anesthesia professional will guide you safely through your surgery by relying on his or her clinical experience, training and judgment combined with proven technology.

What You Should Know About Patient Awareness Under General Anesthesia It is quite rare. When it does occur, it is often fleeting and not traumatic to the patient. Patients experiencing awareness usually do not feel any pain. Some patients may experience a feeling of pressure. Awareness can range from brief, hazy recollections to some specific awareness of your surroundings during surgery. Patients who dream during surgery, or who have some perception of their surroundings before or after surgery, may think they have experienced awareness. Such a sensation or memory does not necessarily represent actual awareness during surgery. Experts in the field of anesthesiology are actively studying this condition and are seeking the most effective ways to prevent it. Awareness can occur in high-risk surgeries such as trauma and cardiac surgery in which the patient’s condition may not allow for a deep anesthetic to be given. In those instances, the anesthesia professional will weigh the potential for awareness against the need to guard the patient’s life or safety. The same is true during a cesarean section, particularly if it is an emergency and a deep anesthetic is not best for the mother or child.

It has been shown that early counseling after an episode of awareness can help to lessen feelings of confusion, stress or trauma associated with the experience. Researchers in anesthesiology have spearheaded developments in technology that have dramatically improved patient safety and comfort during surgery over the last 20 years. A highly trained anesthesia professional should be involved in your surgery. No technology can replace this expertise. New brain-wave monitoring devices currently being tested may prove to be helpful in reducing the risk of awareness, but they need to undergo the same rigorous scientific review process that has led to wide adoption of other medical technologies. Patients should talk with their anesthesia professional before surgery to discuss all of their concerns, including the remote possibility of awareness. These professionals work to ensure the best possible care of patients in the operating room.

Patient awareness happens very infrequently. This remote possibility should not deter you from having needed surgery. Your anesthesia professional can help you to feel comfortable and informed about your upcoming experience with anesthesia.

What does the future hold? As patient advocates, anesthesia professionals are working hard to reduce the likelihood of awareness under general anesthesia. Depending upon the type of surgery, these experts have an array of proven technologies that can be used to monitor various vital signs of the surgical patient. Extensive research is under way to develop and study new technologies, such as brain-wave monitoring, that may lessen the risk of awareness. At the present time, none of these new technologies has been perfected.

Remember—no monitoring device can replace the judgment and skill of an anesthesia professional who has years of training and clinical experience. Working together, you and your anesthesia professional can make your anesthetic experience as safe and comfortable as possible.

What should I do if I think I have experienced awareness? The American Society of Anesthesiologists urges you to talk with your anesthesia professional, who can explain to you the events that took place in the operating room at any stage of your surgery and why you might have been aware at certain times. It is important to note that a variety of anesthetic agents is often used, some of which may create false memories or no memory at all of the various events surrounding surgery. If you have distinct recollections of your surgery and want to discuss them, your anesthesia professional can help you or refer you to a counselor or to other appropriate resources.

----

In a rich world, a persons value depends on attractiveness and youth. If you are rich and older, just invest in destruction. The poorer the world, the less does your value depend on youth.

----

'Paedophilia is natural and normal for males'

How some university academics make the case for paedophiles at summer conferences

The Telegraph

After the report into Jimmy Savile and the conviction of Rolf Harris, Britain has gone into a convulsion of anxiety about child abuse in the Eighties

"Paedophilic interest is natural and normal for human males,” said the presentation. “At least a sizeable minority of normal males would like to have sex with children … Normal males are aroused by children.”

Some yellowing tract from the Seventies or early Eighties, era of abusive celebrities and the infamous PIE, the Paedophile Information Exchange? No. Anonymous commenters on some underground website? No again.

The statement that paedophilia is “natural and normal” was made not three decades ago but last July. It was made not in private but as one of the central claims of an academic presentation delivered, at the invitation of the organisers, to many of the key experts in the field at a conference held by the University of Cambridge. Other presentations included “Liberating the paedophile: a discursive analysis,” and “Danger and difference: the stakes of hebephilia.”

Hebephilia is the sexual preference for children in early puberty, typically 11 to 14-year-olds.

Another attendee, and enthusiastic participant from the floor, was one Tom O’Carroll, a multiple child sex offender, long-time campaigner for the legalisation of sex with children and former head of the Paedophile Information Exchange. “Wonderful!” he wrote on his blog afterwards. “It was a rare few days when I could feel relatively popular!”

Last week, after the conviction of Rolf Harris, the report into Jimmy Savile and claims of an establishment cover-up to protect a sex-offending minister in Margaret Thatcher’s Cabinet, Britain went into a convulsion of anxiety about child abuse in the Eighties. But unnoticed amid the furore is a much more current threat: attempts, right now, in parts of the academic establishment to push the boundaries on the acceptability of child sex.

Jimmy Savile exploited the trust of a nation for his own vile purposes

A key factor in what happened all those decades ago in the dressing rooms of the BBC, the wards of the NHS and, allegedly, the corridors of power was not just institutional failings or establishment “conspiracies”, but a climate of far greater intellectual tolerance of practices that horrify today.

With the Pill, the legalisation of homosexuality and shrinking taboos against premarital sex, the Seventies was an era of quite sudden sexual emancipation. Many liberals, of course, saw through PIE’s cynical rhetoric of “child lib”. But to others on the Left, sex by or with children was just another repressive boundary to be swept away – and some of the most important backing came from academia.

In 1981, a respectable publisher, Batsford, published Perspectives on Paedophilia, edited by Brian Taylor, a sociology lecturer at Sussex University, to challenge what Dr Taylor’s introduction called the “prejudice” against child sex. Disturbingly, the book was aimed at “social workers, community workers, probation officers and child care workers”.

The public, wrote Dr Taylor, “generally thinks of paedophiles as sick or evil men who lurk around school playgrounds in the hope of attempting unspecified beastliness with unsuspecting innocent children”. That, he reassured readers, was merely a “stereotype”, both “inaccurate and unhelpful”, which flew in the face of the “empirical realities of paedophile behaviour”. Why, most adult-child sexual relationships occurred in the family!

The perspectives of most, though not all, the contributors, appeared strongly pro-paedophile. At least two were members of PIE and at least one, Peter Righton, (who was, incredibly, director of education at the National Institute for Social Work) was later convicted of child sex crimes. But from the viewpoint of today, the fascinating thing about Perspectives on Paedophilia is that at least two of its contributors are still academically active and influential.

Prof Ken Plummer, left, and former PIE head Tom O'Carroll Ken Plummer is emeritus professor of sociology at Essex University, where he has an office and teaches courses, the most recent scheduled for last month. “The isolation, secrecy, guilt and anguish of many paedophiles,” he wrote in Perspectives on Paedophilia, “are not intrinsic to the phenomen[on] but are derived from the extreme social repression placed on minorities …

“Paedophiles are told they are the seducers and rapists of children; they know their experiences are often loving and tender ones. They are told that children are pure and innocent, devoid of sexuality; they know both from their own experiences of childhood and from the children they meet that this is not the case.”

As recently as 2012, Prof Plummer published on his personal blog a chapter he wrote in another book, Male Intergenerational Intimacy, in 1991. “As homosexuality has become slightly less open to sustained moral panic, the new pariah of 'child molester’ has become the latest folk devil,” he wrote. “Many adult paedophiles say that boys actively seek out sex partners … 'childhood’ itself is not a biological given but an historically produced social object.” Prof Plummer confirmed to The Sunday Telegraph that he had been a member of PIE in order to “facilitate” his research. He said: “I would never want any of my work to be used as a rationale for doing 'bad things’ – and I regard all coercive, abusive, exploitative sexuality as a 'bad thing’. I am sorry if it has impacted anyone negatively this way, or if it has encouraged this.” However, he did not answer when asked if he still held the views he expressed in the Eighties and Nineties. A spokesman for Essex University claimed Prof Plummer’s work “did not express support for paedophilia” and cited the university’s charter which gave academic staff “freedom within the law to put forward controversial and unpopular opinions without placing themselves in jeopardy”.

Graham Powell is one of the country’s most distinguished psychologists, a past president of the British Psychological Society and a current provider of psychology support services to the Serious Organised Crime Agency, the National Crime Squad, the Metropolitan Police, Kent Police, Essex Police and the Internet Watch Foundation. In Perspectives on Paedophilia, however, he co-authored a chapter which stated: “In the public mind, paedophile attention is generally assumed to be traumatic and to have lasting and wholly deleterious consequences for the victim. The evidence that we have considered here does not support this view … we need to ask not why are the effects of paedophile action so large, but why so small.”

The chapter does admit that there were “methodological problems” with the studies the authors relied on which “leave our conclusions somewhat muted”. Dr Powell told The Sunday Telegraph last week that “what I wrote was completely wrong and it is a matter of deep regret that it could in any way have made things more difficult [for victims]”. He said: “The literature [scientific evidence] was so poor in 1981, people just didn’t realise what was going on. There was a lack of understanding at the academic level.” Dr Powell said he had never been a member of PIE.

In other academic quarters, with rather fewer excuses, that lack of understanding appears to be reasserting itself. The Cambridge University conference, on July 4-5 last year, was about the classification of sexuality in the DSM, a standard international psychiatric manual used by the police and courts.

After a fierce battle in the American Psychiatric Association (APA), which produces it, a proposal to include hebephilia as a disorder in the new edition of the manual has been defeated. The proposal arose because puberty in children has started ever earlier in recent decades and as a result, it was argued, the current definition of paedophilia – pre-pubertal sexual attraction – missed out too many young people.

Ray Blanchard, professor of psychiatry at the University of Toronto, who led the APA’s working group on the subject, said that unless some other way was found of encompassing hebephilia in the new manual, that was “tantamount to stating that the APA’s official position is that the sexual preference for early pubertal children is normal”.

Prof Blanchard was in turn criticised by a speaker at the Cambridge conference, Patrick Singy, of Union College, New York, who said hebephilia would be abused as a diagnosis to detain sex offenders as “mentally ill” under US “sexually violent predator” laws even after they had completed their sentences.

But perhaps the most controversial presentation of all was by Philip Tromovitch, a professor at Doshisha University in Japan, who stated in a presentation on the “prevalence of paedophilia” that the “majority of men are probably paedophiles and hebephiles” and that “paedophilic interest is normal and natural in human males”. O’Carroll, the former PIE leader, was thrilled, and described on his blog how he joined Prof Tromovitch and a colleague for drinks after the conference. “The conversation flowed most agreeably, along with the drinks and the beautiful River Cam,” he said.

It’s fair to say the Tromovitch view does not represent majority academic opinion. It’s likely, too, that some of the academic protests against the “stigmatisation” of paedophiles are as much a backlash against the harshness of sex offender laws as anything else. Finally, of course, academic inquiry is supposed to question conventional wisdom and to deal rigorously with the evidence, whether or not the conclusions it leads you to are popular. Even so, there really is now no shortage of evidence about the harm done by child abuse. In the latest frenzy about the crimes of the past, it’s worth watching whether we could, in the future, go back to the intellectual climate which allowed them.

----

When African men in Nigeria, Uganda, Kenya, Morocco, or Egypt are confronted with the masturbation lifestyle propagated by the Spanish masturbation teacher Fran Sanchez Oria, they feel disturbed. Does Sanchez not have a mother who feels ashame when her son propagates worldwide that men should keep on masturbating on and on. Does he want his family to be known for such a member?

----

The world in 200 years will be populated by a few thousand male humans who live indefinitely, and a huge number of female looking robots. Women aren't needed, really, and anyway, women are troublemakers, more than anything else.

----

This Is What It’s Like to Spend an Hour With “Neomasculinity” Blogger Roosh

Washingtonian

Hearing that Daryush Valizadeh, a blogger who set off global outrage last week when he planned to organize men-only “tribal gatherings” around the world, would be holding a press conference Saturday night in a Dupont Circle hotel was like receiving an invitation to a real-life meeting with one of the odder corners of internet culture. Valizadeh had already had an interesting week: His planned meetings resurfaced an article he wrote last year in which he suggested rapes committed on private property should be legal, prompting internet-wide condemnation, rebukes from government officials around the globe, and the online-activist group Anonymous publishing his parents’ address.

A day after the Daily Mail followed Anonymous’s tip to a Silver Spring cul-de-sac and found him at the door, Valizadeh—who goes by the nom-de-blog “Roosh V”—hastily called the press conference, supposedly to dispel charges that he is a “pro-rape” advocate. The set-up suggested the strangeness that was to come. Valizadeh did not supply the exact location until less than two hours before it started. He arrived escorted by a clutch of burly men who he said were bodyguards, and set up his own cameras to ensure his online followers would have their own view of the proceedings with the dozen or journalists who took the bait.

What followed was nearly an hour of ranting, evasions, and accusations ranging from broadside attacks on all media to responding to one of my questions by asking, “Do you lift?” And rather than spend the remainder of the night adding to his purported sexual conquests—Valizadeh has self-published more than a dozen “guides” to seducing women in many different countries, all with the word “Bang” in the title—he followed the press conference by setting his Twitter followers loose on the reporters who showed up.

“This article, to a ten-year-old, was obvious I didn’t intend to legalize rape or cause harm against women,” Valizadeh said about his February 2015 post that his critics seized upon. While he said it was meant to be satire from the start, though, it is not difficult to see why readers would take it as his genuine belief.

As “Roosh V,” Valizadeh has built up a small but dedicated following of a philosophy he calls “neomasculinity.” He believes that women should be socially and physically submissive to men, claims to have 1 million monthly readers, and has written about multiple sexual encounters in which the woman was too inebriated to give consent.

But rather than give off a veneer of strength and virility, Valizadeh on Saturday came off as rambling, paranoid, and defensive, answering nearly every question by pivoting back to his belief that he is the victim of a media conspiracy, guzzling through several bottles of water in the process. He told a reporter from Vice Media that the company peddles “garbage,” and called the Daily Beast a CIA front.

“As you see I’ve been under a lot of stress from this mob that’s coming after me because of these things you wrote that don’t conform to the real world, and I don’t get it,” he said. “You’re ready to write that this guy is pro-rape without knowing where that false idea comes from.”

Even if Valizadeh’s professed exploits have been on the right side of the law, they do not, as Vox pointed out last week, comport to most people’s definition of rape. (The FBI defines it as “penetration, no matter how slight” without consent.)

“I’ve never been accused of rape,” he said. “Nobody’s ever read something by me and went onto rape, because I know if they did hurt a woman it would be all over the news.

---

Universal education for women is not in the interest of men. For some women, a good education is OK. For the majority, it is unneeded.

----

Ageism is pest of rich countries. If you are old you have no value. In poor countries, value depends on wealth. That is much better than value depending on youth because wealth can become more with advancing years. This is why rich men have every reason to invest in destruction. Plain math.

----

Three human traffickers who fooled women into prostitution in Dubai are jailed

The National

DUBAI // Three men who persuaded two maids to run away from their sponsor before selling them into the sex industry have been jailed for five years each.

The Bangladeshis were convicted of trafficking the two Indonesian women, a charge they denied in August.

One 33-year-old victim told Dubai Criminal Court that she and the other maid were encouraged to flee their sponsor’s home in Ras Al Khaimah after five months in the UAE.

They were taken by one of the men to a hotel in RAK, where they spent the night before heading to Dubai.

"They took me to a flat in Dubai where I was sold for Dh4,000 and told I have to work in prostitution," said the woman, who was locked up and assaulted when she refused.

She was forced to have sex with different men against her will, including one of the defendants, and escaped when she fell ill and was taken to a hospital.

"They gave me Dh500 for my treatment, which I used to hail a cab and head to a police station," she said.

The second victim, 42, said her compatriot made arrangements with the defendants to run away from their sponsor without knowing they would be sold into the sex industry.

"We were both locked up after we refused to prostitute ourselves, but two days later I managed to run away while the man who was keeping guard of the flat fell asleep," said the maid, who also went to the police.

The incident took place in June 2015 but the defendants were arrested in March last year.

A 35-year-old receptionist said he saw the men at the hotel in RAK where they booked four rooms.

"This was not the first time I saw one of the men. He had been a regular guest for over six years and every time he checks in, he comes with different women," said the Indian.

Prosecutors said the men confessed to trafficking during investigations but they denied the charges in court.

They will all be deported after serving their prison terms.

----

Your agenda is clear. Optimal health and great sex at age 100. Be careful with what you put into yourself. Men should follow the Serge Kreutz diet. Women are more disposable and will sooner or later be replaced bylove robots.

---

The Serge Kreutz diet is the ultimate sex diet via the day-long stimulation of taste buds with chocolate.

----

Home | Index of articles