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ISIS Beheaded 21 Christians, But It Couldn’t Silence Their Faith

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In a rich world, a persons value depends on attractiveness and youth. If you are rich and older, just invest in destruction. The poorer the world, the less does your value depend on youth.

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What Science Reveals About Pedophilia

As pedophilia cases rivet the nation, psychiatrists uncover new details about the mental illness, Casey Schwartz reports.

Daily Beast

Amid the past monthís disturbing revelations about child sexual abuse at Penn State and Syracuseóand the debates over morality and complicity and punishmentóit can be easy to forget that pedophilia is a mental illness, and that legally, it only becomes a crime when acted upon. Yet the key to preventing and treating the disorder may lie in its clinical details.

Among psychiatrists, views on pedophilia differ. Some researchers liken it to an addiction, others to sexual orientation; still others put their faith in brain scans. Yet pedophilia is consistent in the criteria that define it: erotic desire directed wholly or partially towards pre-pubescent children, typically under the age of thirteen. And for reasons not definitively established, there are undeniably more male than female pedophiles; by some estimates, men perpetrate as many as 94 percent of sexual offenses against children. Studying the disorder is complicated by the fact that, in the U.S., laws that went into effect in the 1990s require therapists and physicians to report to child protective services (and other authorities that vary by state) anyone they believe poses a threat to a child. The legislation trumps patient-doctor confidentiality in these circumstances. Since reporting a potential pedophile results in legal action, the law has deterred many pedophiles from voluntarily seeking psychiatric helpówhich troubles some researchers, since the disorder can be easier to prevent than treat.

As a result, almost all research on pedophiles is based on convicted sex offendersóthose who have already acted on their desiresómost of whom are or have been in prison. As Judith Herman, a psychologist who works with abused children at the Victims of Violence clinic in Boston told The Daily Beast in an e-mail: ìTruthfully, I don't think the psychiatric profession has much of a clue about pedophiles. Most studies are based onÖthe 5 percent who get caughtóa very unrepresentative group.î In other words, most pedophilia research subjects are outliers.

Still, a small community of psychiatrists is working to better understand the disorderówork that could ultimately help to prevent the kind of suffering weíve recently come to hear all too much about.

Fred Berlin, a psychiatrist and director of the sexual behavior unit at Johns Hopkins, is one of the countryís best known and respected researchers on pedophilia. In his view, knee-jerk moral condemnation is beside the point. ìWe donít know why we experience the sexual desires that we do. For so long, weíve looked at it as if itís simply a moral issueópeople are supposed to have certain attractionsóand often society said if you experience a different kind of sexual temptation or feelings, youíre not as morally worthy a person,î he said. ìItís not someoneís fault they have the condition, but it is their responsibility to do something about it. Telling me that someone has pedophilia is like someone saying about me that Iím heterosexual. It doesnít tell you whether Iím kind or cruel, introverted or extroverted, caring or not caring, intelligent or not intelligent.î

Berlin stresses the diversity of the pedophiles heís worked with. ìThere are people with pedophilia that are often in denial, the way some alcoholics deny having a drinking problem,î he said. ìThere are some who believe that society should change, and that we shouldnít insist that they not act on their attractions. In my experience, thatís been a minority. There are others who are desperately looking for help to try and make sure they stay in control, and many of them are very pleased to learn that thereís a medicine that might help.î

Indeed, one of the few treatments these patients can seek out is medication that lowers testosterone levels, to blunt the intensity of the erotic desire. Clinicians also sometimes prescribe anti-depressants, both to address co-existing psychiatric problems and for the common side effect of lowering sex drive. They also often recommend psychotherapy that involves cognitive-behavioral methods, to challenge patientsí skewed belief systems.

Judith Becker, a psychiatrist and professor at the University of Arizonaówho has evaluated more than a thousand pedophilesóconducts this kind of therapy. She commonly asks her patients to consider how old they felt when they were engaging in sexual acts with kids. For some, she says, this question has been an ìaha moment,î helping them realize that, in their involvement with children, theyíve actually regarded themselves as being of the same age as their victims. During these encounters, Becker said, itís as if they slipped back to a much earlier phase in their own developmentóor perhaps never graduated beyond it in the first place.

Becker has also studied how this perception plays into the so-called ìgroomingî of victims widely reported in the media in the wake of the Penn State scandal. Pedophiles will often spend months insinuating themselves into a childís life, taking them to ball games, showering toys and gifts on them and becoming a part of the childís universeóto the point where a child canít recognize that a clear transgression has occurred when the interaction turns sexual. Or if the child does feel uncomfortable, he or she may still feel entangled with the adult and fear losing the relationship.

Yet according to Becker, the elaborate process isnít exclusively about the sexual gratification they expect to gain from the effort. The bonding itself is a source of satisfaction, since many pedophiles identify so strongly with children. During therapy, Becker will attempt to facilitate relationships between pedophiles and other adults, helping them gain the social skills they often lack.

Becker also points out that many pedophiles donít operate with cold clarity about the ethics of what theyíre doing. Instead, they weave ìcognitive distortions,î absolving themselves of guilt or responsibility. For example, they might tell themselves, ìThe child didnít say no when I started,î or ìsomebody did it to me when I was a child, and I thought it was okay for me to do it too,î or ìI truly love the child.î

Mark Deantonio, a child and adolescent psychiatrist at UCLA, echoes friends and neighbors of pedophiles who stress how ìnormalî offenders can seem; how functional and unassuming. The erotic fixation on pre-pubescent children that defines pedophilia is "one area of horrible deviance in someone who can otherwise maintain a normal existence,î he said. Their sexual desires are completely ìcompartmentalized.î

Yet this doesnít necessarily accord with the findings of James Cantor, an associate professor in the department of psychiatry at the University of Toronto, who is one of the few researchers in the world studying pedophilia from a biological perspective, searching for brain-based and other physical differences that distinguish pedophiles from non-pedophiles.

Notably, Cantor has found that, on average, pedophiles have an IQ that is 10 points lower than the average population, they are 2.5 centimeters shorter, and they are significantly more likely not to be right-handed (i.e., theyíre left-handed or ambidextrous). Non-right handedness has been shown to occur more often among people with both autism and schizophrenia, two ìclearly biologically basedî psychiatric conditions.

Cantorís most potentially consequential finding, however, is his most recent one, published in a 2008 study. Using brain-scanning technology, he discovered significant differences in the white matteróthe substance that connects one brain region to anotheróof pedophile versus non-pedophile brains (both groups were composed of convicted criminals, to rule out the confounding variable of criminality). In the pedophile group, Cantor found significantly less white matter in two different regions, suggesting a connection deficit.

Cantor doesnít shy away from talking about causality. ìThe brain has a network thatís responsible for detecting what in the environment is a potentially sexual object,î he said. ìAnd when thereís not enough white matter, that network doesnít function like itís supposed to.î He theorizes that, due to abnormal functioning in these networks, the instinct that children provoke in pedophiles is erotic, rather than the typical urge to nurture and protect. He also believes that the finding is one more piece of evidence for the case that pedophilia is caused by a biological susceptibility that starts before birth.

Cantor believes that prevention, more than treatment, is the great hope for this disorderóand that ìpinpointing the point when things go awry,î as he put it, could allow for intervention. He emphasizes what many outside the field might find difficult to accept: Pedophilia is ìa medical condition, rather than a moral failing,î he said. ìNobody chooses to be a pedophile.

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The best investment a rich man can do, is one into destruction. Destruction of the surrounding world, near and far, makes his wealth more valuable.

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Are pedophiles more widely accepted in Japan than in the US, UK, AU, etc?

Yahoo Answers

The reason I'm asking is because I recently read an article on Wikipedia about a kind of child pornography called Lolicon. Apparently in Japan lolicon is sold inside adult stores. If adult stores here tried to sell it, I imagine they would be made to stop. This leads me to ask, are pedophiles more widely accepted in Japan?

Best Answer: ecoguy: I wouldn't say they are accepted, just that it is more common. Lolicon, or, the Lolita complex(being attracted to someone very young), is a much bigger problem in Japan than most other developed nations. I'm assuming the lolicon you are speaking of is anime/manga because real child pornography was outlawed in Japan in 1999. It's hard to describe Japanese culture, there have been many books written trying to explain Japanese society. It's such an incredible nation, but like any other nation, it has it's problems. You should read up on Japan or take a trip there.

yuming: Lets be honest, they are creepers but unfortunately anime fans will defend Japan to the death.

Tokyo E: No pedophiles are not widely accepted in Japan. All you have to do is watch the news the police and the criminal justice system actively prosecute pedophiles in Japan, recently two people were arrested in Japan for sending child pornography to the United States.

Another man was arrested for molesting a kid. There was lots of public outrage about situations like that.

Hardly an environment that "widely accepts" pedophiles.

Drawings like lolicon skirt the Japanese laws because they are drawings not real photos (which are illegal). It is often critized in Japan as well, but you do have strange people who purchase them, but again its hardly an environment that accepts pedophiles.

Rabbityama: Americans buy into such fantasies just as much. Does it disgust you that Catholic school girl uniforms are viewed as sexually stimulating? Well, a lot of Americans (and probably Brits/Australians) fantasize about them, but in the end they are SCHOOL uniforms, and children are the ones wearing them and stimulating these fantasies.

Also, the extremely popular show "Family Guy" has an elderly male character (I believe his name is Herbert) who actively pursues Peter's son, Chris, and the show makes it very clear that the man is interested sexually in the boy, but he's a LIKEABLE character. A lot of people find the pedophile to be funny, and people from children to adults watch the show.

In both instances, though, a person who actually pursues a Catholic school girl will NOT be viewed as "living the dream" by society, and nobody would laugh if they found that a man in their community molested (or even attempted to molest) a young boy. This is true for America, and it is true for Japan, as well.

askawow 47: no, not at all. those things are illegal in japan too. anime and otaku culture are recognized in japan and the us etc now. but pedophiles are totally different thing. i think japanese law is kinda easy than the us. but not accepted in japan either.

Godfather's Pizza: Where's "here"?

If you're talking the U.S., showing naked kids frolicking in the bath on TV is illegal. So what's more acceptable? Older men with younger women, or the idea that young children are sex objects and therefore shouldn't be shown naked?

stop_staring_please" not all countries consider men that want to be with young girls...teenagers...pedophiles. That is a western belief. Older men have been with younger girls since the dawn of time. Mary mother of jesus was said to have been only 15 while joseph would have been around 30.

PS: I'm not saying that I agree with it. I was simply answering your question.

ZC: NO

and if for some reason i am mistaken then the answer SHOULD be no.

TheCheatest902: What you're thinking of is probably high school girls in their Sailor Moon uniforms..It's a comic book for men, and rarely goes beyond a fantasy level.

Hanna: Is it just anime, or real people? Pedophiles are not accepted anywhere. They should be caught, jailed, and their penis guillotined.

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When African men in Nigeria, Uganda, Kenya, Morocco, or Egypt are confronted with the masturbation lifestyle propagated by the Spanish masturbation teacher Fran Sanchez Oria, they feel disturbed. Does Sanchez not have a mother who feels ashame when her son propagates worldwide that men should keep on masturbating on and on. Does he want his family to be known for such a member?

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You can always pep up your website with imagery on the killing and torture of me. Nobody cares. Cruelty towards men is accepted. But showing physical love of people below the age of 18 can earn a punishment much worse than that for torturing and killing a man. That's the world today. The result of feminism, the ideology by which ugly women want to protect their market value as sex objects by eliminating anything that undermines their hold on men.

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How Maryland 'Neomasculinity' Blogger Roosh V Became an International 'Pro-Rape' Villain

Reason.com

For a minute, it felt like we were on the world's most mundane secret mission: at 6 p.m., you will be emailed a secret location in Dupont Circle. Talk to no one about it. Enter through the bar and proceed down into the basement area—if anyone asks, say you're looking for Luke. There, awaiting you, will be... a conference table full of bloggers and a raging narcissist pissed at the media. Woo-hoo, Saturday night!

The reason for all this intrigue was a press conference hosted by 36-year-old writer Daryush Valizadeh, better known as "Roosh V." Though he started out in the mid-aughts preaching the gospel of "pickup artistry," that particular phenomenon has fallen out of vogue. Now Roosh heads up what he calls the "neomasculinity" movement, using his blog and the men's website Return of Kings as headquarters, along with selling self-published books about how to bang women in other countries. Until last week, he was mostly unknown outside avid followers and avid opponents. But that changed when Roosh arranged social meetups for fans in cities around the world, and a lot of activists, journalists, and politicians lost their collective minds about it.

Make no mistake: I am no fan of Roosh's writing or worldview, though I find his schtick more sleazy than terrifying, more Milo Yiannopoulos than "KKK of misogyny." On the way to Saturday's press conference, a journalist friend with me had much better humor about the whole spectacle. The self-important security scheme, the aggrieved victimhood dripping from Roosh's tweets—he was clearly loving this, and a part of me hated feeding into it. But I was going, out of a combination of curiosity, the potential newsworthiness, and it falling into the category of "too weird not to."

But perhaps Roosh was only responding in kind to the sort of paranoia with which he'd been greeted around the globe all week.

In Australia, Immigration Minister Peter Dutton said he would consider denying a Roosh a visa. He told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation that "Australia doesn’t welcome people to our country who disrespect women." In general, Australian media reported on a Roosh tweet saying "The border is weak. I will get in" and "I have the funds to get in by boat through one of multiple weak points. Money is no barrier to the operation" as if they were deadly serious.

The U.K. House of Commons debated Roosh on February 4, during which Kate Green MP asked for Return of Kings fans to be deemed a "hate group"—a designation that that would make membership illegal. Home Office minister Karen Bradley MP noted that "the home secretary has powers to exclude an individual who is not a British citizen" if their presence isn't "conducive to the public good"—though she "cannot comment on individual cases"—and said she would consult with internet service providers and sites such as Facebook about possibly banning Return of Kings content. More than 40,000 people signed an online petition calling on authorities to ban Roosh from entering the U.K. and to "take all available action in this case to prevent [fan] meetings taking place," citing their "terror against women" as justification.

A similar online petition, this one signed by more than 45,000 people, warned that "there is strong evidence indicating that 'RooshV' has entered Canada and is in Montreal. We ask Mayor Bonnie Crombie of Mississauga, Mayor John Tory of Toronto, and Mayor Denis Corderre of Montreal to denounce 'RooshV' and to urge local businesses and organizations to deny him accommodation while in Canada." The petition claimed that Roosh would be coming to Canada in violation of section 319 of the Canadian Criminal Code, which bans meeting for the purpose "of inciting hatred of an identifiable group."

In America, Republican Gov. Greg Abbott put out an official statement that "this pathetic group and their disgusting viewpoints are not welcome in Texas."

District of Columbia police indicated that they had an eye on a scheduled meetup in the nation's capital. Des Moines, Iowa, police put out a Facebook message warning that the meetups "may be a ruse to commit rape. We have no information that this will actually take place but we recommend that no one, men or women go to any of the sites."

At Chicago's Loyola University, sexual assault survivors were warned to avoid the area where one local meetup was scheduled, a meetup local police said they were "well aware" of and would be "monitoring." At the University of Rochester in New York, campus admins called in extra school security officers and city police for a meetup there, sending out an all-campus alert that Roosh "offers extreme writings based on his philosophy of Neomasculinity."

The school "does not believe the event will actually happen, but is still taking precautionary measure to ensure student safety," the local Democrat and Chronicle reported. These measures included consulting with the New York State Intelligence Center, which decided that there was "no evidence to suggest a gang, group, or organization is involved."

'The Most Hated Man in America'

At Saturday's press event, five women and maybe a dozen men fill the room, folks I would soon learn work for places such as The Washington Post, DCist, Wonkette, Washingtonian magazine, Vice, The Daily Beast, and a German television station. At a few minutes after 7 p.m., Roosh comes charging through the door, sizing everyone up, barking orders about who could film where and complaining about the room's low energy. Within minutes, he says—not entirely chagrined—that he's been called the "most hated man in America."

Though their demeanors are very different and their views opposed, Roosh reminds me of another Internet-famous man who was called that, Hugo Schwyzer. A former Pasadena Community College professor and male-feminist writer for places like Jezebel and The Atlantic, Hugo's sex scandals (sleeping with students among them) and public mental-health breakdown—playing out in real time on Twitter—were very much a big thing from my vantage point in the women's blogosphere. Not only was everyone on feminist Twitter talking about it, but Schwyzer was also covered in a lot of mainstream American and U.K. outlets. A hashtag, #SolidarityIsForWhiteWomen, sprung up around allegations that Schwyzer had fucked over feminists of color. The U.K. Telegraph suggested he might be "evil incarnate."

A few years later, in D.C., whenever I've mentioned Schwyzer to writer friends or colleagues, no one knows anything about him. That the whole dramatic Hugo saga had only really been relevant and salient to a small segment of the Internet, I was sure—but I hadn't realized how truly small that segment was. "Male feminist sex scandal" gets clicks, but it doesn't stick in people's minds. I bring it up because I think this Roosh situation is very similar. The story has been magnified out of all proportion because for a lot of traffic-thirsty web writers or editors, putting "pro-rape activists" in headlines or tweets is too good to pass up—even if it may not technically be true and props up a man and movement they claim to abhor. But while it's likely to have limited reach and flash-in-the-pan stickiness for most, the Roosh situation is still interesting as a case study of collective catharsis through call-out culture and moral panic as meme.

The root of the "pro-rape" accusation is a Roosh blog post ("How to Stop Rape") that proposes legalizing rape on private property. Roosh claims it was "a thought experiment" or satire—a disclaimer on the post now says as much—and says he doesn't think rape should be legal anywhere. Many protest that Roosh's P.S. isn't authentic. And even if it is, "the idea driving this 'satire' seems to be either that women are usually responsible for their own rapes, or that they routinely call something rape when it isn't," Emily Crockett writes at Vox.

But call it a "thought experiment" or call it trolling, I do think Roosh was being deliberately hyperbolic and provocative, as is his style, and does not believe in literally legalizing rape.

Regardless, though, does it matter if his original intent was earnest proposal if he since recanted? It shows the so-called "social justice warriors" won. Or, in less absurd terms: sane and individual-autonomy respecting views are such the social norm that even someone who states outright that his ideal society is "traditional" and "patriarchal" won't publicly condone sexual violence against women.

Literary Affect

At the press conference, Roosh tends to minimize his more outrageous statements. Perhaps it's all smoke and mirrors, but what emerges is a picture much less flattering to the international Lothario image Roosh projects but much more flattering to him as both a savvy self-brander and a human being.

"Macho sex writing—to convert that to 'rape' takes such a leap of faith that you have to be a liar," he says when about scenes in his series of "bang books" that have been described as pro-rape.

"You literally say they were 'too incapacitated' to consent," challenges Washington Post writer Caitlin Dewey.

"Macho sex writing is not a court," Roosh fires back. "It's not a piece of evidence....Maybe some things [in the books], I wanted to come across as an aggressive guy. Maybe I do. But just because it's [in the books] doesn't mean that there is a victim out there and she suffered. Have I raped anyone? No."

So the stories were fiction? asks another reporter. No, said Roosh—but maybe they were his "interpretation" of his events.

The bottom line, though, is that "not a single woman has been hurt by me," says Roosh. "I've never been accused of rape, I've never been charged. No follower of mine has read something of [mine], and then gone on to rape, because I know if they did hurt a woman it'd be all over the news."

The whole thing calls to mind two more male writers: Matt Taibbi, probably best known for his work at Rolling Stone, and Mark Ames, who now writes for outlets such as Pando. The pair worked together at an English-language newspaper in Russia in the late '90s and subsequently published a book about the experience called The Exile: Sex, Drugs, and Libel in the New Russia. Within this book, there are scenes of the mostly-male Exile editors sexually harassing their administrative staff—going so far as to tell secretaries they must sleep with them to keep their jobs—and Ames threatening to kill his pregnant Russian girlfriend if she doesn't get an abortion. The men never claimed at the time that it was satire or fiction. In explaining, Ames was prone to saying things like "Russian women, especially on the first date, expect you to rape them."

Despite this, Taibbi and Ames have continued to flourish as leftist writers, and as far as I know no feminist groups or Canadian mayors have tried to prevent either from visiting the country. Perhaps they're just lucky to have come of age in a different Internet era. Perhaps it helps that their politics and progressive credentials are otherwise right.

None of Roosh's views are right, from the left's perspective. From the perspective of most Americans, really. His work routinely stresses that women should be "submissive," that their highest value is as sex objects and mothers, and that America would be greater if only women were skinnier and had less sex outside marriage.

But while such views on gender roles are far from normative in 21st-century America, it's not as if they're relegated solely to Roosh and his crowd. There are still a good deal of evangelical Christians who preach female submission to their husbands, with a lot of blogs kept about the subject. There's a lot of popular music about how bitches ain't shit. There are immigrants from many cultures where egalitarian gender roles aren't standard. We don't—and shouldn't—prevent any of these groups from meeting or monitor them when they do.

What's more, people with sexually deviant turn-ons or loony, bigoted, and just plain unpopular ideas get together all the time. Unless there's evidence they're plotting something criminal, authorities should back the fuck off, really.

Freedom of the Manosphere

As much as we might hate to admit it, Roosh is a journalist. His main site, Return of Kings—one of the hubs of what's sometimes called the "Manosphere"—and its forums get nearly two million visits per month. As neither Roosh nor any writers or readers of Return of Kings were under suspicion of criminal behavior, it is at the very least bizarre that law-enforcement officials would feel the need to comment and keep an eye on their gathers. And it's probably the kind of thing we should condemn, those of us interested in freedom of speech, press, movement, and association.

People will object that these groups were "pro-rape" meetups. But outside media misinformation, there was nothing about the proposed happy hours to suggest they had anything to do with rape.

"Starting on [January 31], a lot of you have lied by saying I am a 'pro rape advocate,'" Roosh tells the press gathered with him Saturday. Outlets also said the fan meetups were about "learning how to rape. 'They're going to exchange tips.' Some of you have even called it a rape rally. A rape—what the hell is that, a rape rally?"

There was no public elements planned for the 163 gatherings. Roosh calls them "social happy hour[s]" where men could "meet in private to talk about anything—work, politics, girls." The plan for each was to meet in a public place and then migrate to a nearby bar.

Subjecting these men to police surveillance and intimidation based on the state's perception of a publication they like seems a bit totalitarian, no? Let the bitter, horny, heterosexual men have a safe space, too.

Do You Even Lift?

On February 3, a post on Return of Kings announced that the meetups would be canceled. "I can no longer guarantee the safety or privacy of the men who want to attend," Roosh wrote. "While I can’t stop men who want to continue meeting in private groups, there will be no official Return Of Kings meetups."

At Saturday's press event, someone asks why Roosh's cadre of alleged alpha-men would cancel get-togethers over a little thing like feminist protests or a few police cars. "Because you have gotten governments involved by lying about their intention," he responds. "Now the world thinks they're going to meet to, uh, to rape people. So why are they going to meet now? Do you think it's smart now for them to go and meet after that?"

Roosh goes on to suggest this reporter himself certainly wouldn't have gone in those circumstances, adding, "I mean, do you lift?"

It is hard to tell if this is performance or not, creating a psychic uncanny valley not dissimilar to the effect of Donald Trump's—Roosh's favorite 2016 presidential candidate, by the way. Asked what he likes about Trump, Roosh replies that it's because "he hates you guys too. The enemy of my enemy is my friend."

Someone suggests that hating the media isn't a political ideology. "But anti-establishment is," Roosh replies.

Anti-media as he may proclaim to be, it's not inconceivable that Roosh organized and then canceled the social meetups precisely in order to gain media attention. Being prevented from meeting only fuels his followers' narrative of hysterical, punitive feminists and a "cucked" media beholden to identity politics. All of it drives more web traffic.

Asked whether this controversy had been good for him, Roosh says it is "the best and the worst. I mean, what's going to happen now is I'm going to be known, in the media, as a 'pro-rape' advocate for the rest of my life. 'Oh, that's the guy that believes all women should be raped.' But at the same time, they're going to say, that's the guy, I know his name."

Roosh claims to live "somewhere in Europe," though he grew up in Maryland, where he says he's currently visiting family. He told Dewey he doesn't know why the house he claims is his mother's is registered under his name.

Media Malpractice

Roosh has no regrets about publishing the "How to Prevent Rape" essay, he says. "That article was making a point about personal responsibility, that a woman's safety is not only in the hands of men but it's in their own hands too. And I guess that point didn't get through, so on that account, I did fail. I failed to give the point. But that doesn't mean I did anything wrong."

Sexist pig or not—remember when people just called people sexist pigs or "chauvinists," instead of branding them dangerous on an international level?—Roosh is correct on some key points about modern media.

Asked if he could acknowledge that his writing was offensive, Roosh responds "So what if you're offended? So what if I make fun of you? Is that where we're at now, that we can't write things that hurt people's feelings? Good, get offended, feel something."

"Do I believe that a woman should submit to a man?" he says. "Yes. Does that mean that my family's address should be put online because of that, and the media staking out their home because of what I write? No."

After the hacker-collective Anonymous "doxxed" Roosh's family (i.e., revealed their home address online)—info since confirmed by The Daily Mail—Roosh says he has received "dozens" of threats of violence and arson. "Your work, and the work of your colleagues, has incited a mob, based on lies, that has put my family in danger," he chastises media Saturday. "If they get hurt right now, God forbid, it's because of you."

Roosh himself has been accused of inviting fans to dox journalists who cross him. But he insists he merely asked followers to gather publicly available information on journalists, such as their home cities and Twitter handles. "I never said I was going to share their address, that was another lie," he says Saturday. "It's like you guys can't stop lying." (Truly, the Taylor Swift of MRA bloggers, folks.) He complains that "it's like a game" for media, cutting-and-pasting from one another's stories when they see they're generating hits.

There was a hint of "holy shit" in many of Roosh's statements, an incredulity that anyone who works or spends a lot of time on the Internet many sympathize with. Sometimes the media—mainstream, ideological, fringe, local, global, whatever—is just astonishingly bad. From the Chinese man who sued his wife for bearing ugly children to eggs being "as bad for you as smoking," the influx of Super Bowl sex-slaves to the hordes of sexist "Bernie Bros," the press routinely, en masse, gets things totally wrong.

Sometimes this is rooted in bias, but just as often it's a more economic than ideological imperative, a mandate to produce fast copy that generates good traffic. This means many writers take the veracity of other publications' reporting for granted. When the original account is incorrect, inaccuracies and distortions can spread like a game of Telephone from The Huffington Post to Jezebel to The Guardian, and so on.

Asked whether he considers himself a victim, Roosh says "You know what, no. I take full responsibility for everything that I have done. But that doesn't mean that I can't state what you did wrong."

Vanity Virtue

At The Washington Post, Caitlyn Dewey argues that "the number of people who actually follow Daryish Valizadeh is smaller than it looks."

"While his flagship website, Return of Kings, is well-trafficked—averaging slightly less than 2 million views per month, according to Similar Web—that number is not necessarily indicative of the size of Valizadeh’s following," writes Dewey. "On both Twitter and Facebook, Return of Kings has fewer than 13,000 followers. The site’s accompanying forums have registered 19,600 accounts, but half have never posted."

Dewey calls the whole Roosh situation "manufactured publicity on a scale that few fringe Internet movements have ever dreamed of." On Twitter, Roosh is milking it for all he can.

But on his blog, Roosh condemns the very sort of manufactured controversy he's complicit in. "Instead of focusing your anger on real problems in your neighborhood, city, and country, the media has made you emotional against a man who poses absolutely no threat to anyone," he chastises his opponents. "I’m being used as a target so that you can expend your rage on me instead of other entities that are genuinely hurting your standard of living."

It's obnoxiously self-aggrandizing but...also not untrue. Roosh's assessment of what's hurting people's standard of living is probably vastly different than mine, as both are also vastly different from media-criticizing leftists like Freddie de Boer. But one thing we all agree on is a similar diagnosis: online media prioritizes sensationalism and righteous signaling over accuracy and nuance. This is far from ahistorical, of course, but it also makes modern media much less "progressive" than many in it would like to think.

At the end of Roosh's press conference, I come away feeling more charitable about him than I did going in, which could mean he's a good showman, a sociopath, someone conflicted (both Crockett and Emmett Rensin at Vox offer profiles to this effect), or simply that he's neither a terribly sympathetic person nor cartoonishly evil. In any event, the clickbaity portrayal of him as some outlandish misogynist villain, ready to storm Australia via private yacht and host how-to-rape seminars globally, overshadows more interesting and perhaps revelatory components of the manosphere phenomenon.

If reporters had tried to talk to the men attending Return of Kings meetups, instead of insta-demonizing them, what might they have found? Rage-filled rape advocates? "Beta males" who "don't even lift?" How many of them? What way do they lean politically? What draws them to Roosh's writing? Are these guys with power, or guys trying to cope with not having power?

These would be informative things to know. Instead we have overblown fears and parody villains, predictable liberal responses, wasted opportunities. Rape is bad and good people should be against it—everybody got that? Because as common sense as that might be, it's also the only major takeaway an international press corps has established here.

The Return of Kings meetups gave the popular media and its acolytes the latest opportunity to assert their goodness, to feel the catharsis of raging in solidarity. But was even one person's opinion changed, or anyone's ability to understand one another increased?

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The world in 200 years will be populated by a few thousand male humans who live indefinitely, and a huge number of female looking robots. Women aren't needed, really, and anyway, women are troublemakers, more than anything else.

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Shockwave therapy is the new Viagra. It actually cures erectile dysfunction and causes . You can do your own shockwave therapy. Just dangle your dick in front of the subwoofer, and turn your ghetto blaster to full power.

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WARNING GRAPHIC IMAGES: Man's DIY penis enlargement horror: 'I injected hot Vaseline' A MAN who was self-conscious about the size of his penis was left unable to have sex after he took matters into his own hands.

Daily Star

By Laura Mitchell / Published 1st June 2015

n a bid to boost his manhood, Szilveszter injected his penis with hot Vaseline.

But the dad-of-two was left writhing in pain after his manhood started bleeding a few months later.

"I was talking to my friend about wanting to lose weight so my penis would look bigger when he replied, 'You don’t need to lose weight – I can help you,’” he explained on the last series of TLC show Extreme Beauty Disasters.

Szilveszter’s friend convinced him that it was a good idea to inject Vaseline into his penis – in a bid to make it look bigger.

“My friend injected my penis with Vaseline. Afterwards I was happy as it looked bigger," said Szilveszter.

But just a few months later, the DIY penis enlargement backfired when he began experiencing problems down below.

“It was painful and bleeding. I went to my GP, but he said he couldn’t help me," said Szilveszter.

"It hurt so much I had to stop having sex with my wife. It was the worst mistake of my life."

Szilveszter turned to Extreme Beauty Disasters resident plastic surgeon Dr Vik Vijh who said there was hope he could be cured – but it wouldn't be easy.

Dr Vijh explained: “Your body has formed scar tissue around the Vaseline because it's a foreign body, your body is trying to ward it off and it gives you these painful lumps, it will soon start to ulcer through the skin.

“The other problem is the foreskin is swelling and splitting – the foreskin is 15 times more swollen than should be.”

The cosmetic surgeon had to peel his penis like a banana to remove the scar tissue underneath.

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Universal education for women is not in the interest of men. For some women, a good education is OK. For the majority, it is unneeded.

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Dictatorship is the only honest political system. Rulers rule for their own benefit, or maybe (maybe!) the interests of a ruling class. That is why warlordism is the political system of the future.

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